How Does Not Having the Equal Rights Amendment Affect Me?



The ERA Would Enforce Equality in Wages, Health Insurance, Pension & Social Security

RIGHT NOW BASIC FUNDAMENTAL HUMAN RIGHTS FOR WOMEN
ARE SUBJECT TO POLITICAL CYCLES.

Women are nearly half of the labor force, increasingly serve as primary breadwinners, and, although we comprise over 50% of college graduates, the reality remains that women make less than men in 99% of all occupations for which data is available.

We are paid less than men for the same jobs and, on average, the gap between what women and men make remains severe. For every dollar that a man makes,
• a White woman earns 77 cents;
• a Black woman earns 68 cents; and
• a Latina earns 59 cents.

On November 17th, 2010 the Paycheck Fairness Act went to the Senate for vote. The women in America were set back again as the bill failed to pass. It would have provided “improvement and modifications” to the Equal Pay Act of 1963.

The act would have “required employers to provide a business justification for paying men and women differently for the same work and make it easier for employees to obtain salary data and ask about salaries without retaliation.” A lack of transparency is a key reason why many women remain underpaid. Currently, a woman makes between 59-77 cents to each dollar a man earns.

Facts About The Gender Pay Gap

• Women are half as likely to receive a pension as men.
• Pension benefits for women are only about half as large as those of men.
• Nearly half of all single black and hispanic women have zero or negative wealth.
• Women can pay up to 47% more for health insurance.

The Situation Without ERA

• Women are 52% of the population but only 17% of Congress.
• Women are 46.5% of the workforce but only 12% of its corporate officers.
• Women are 55% of Hollywood’s audience but only 9% of its directors.
• Women do 90% of the unpaid labor of raising children and caring for the elderly and sick.

Women in the United States can no longer afford to ignore economic discrimination and inequity.

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